Your Voice in my Head By Emma Forrest

Title: Your Voice in my Head

Author: Emma Forrest

First Published: 1st January 2011

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing PLC

Blurb:

Emma Forrest, an English journalist, was twenty-two and living in America when she realised that her quirks had gone beyond eccentricity. Lonely, in a dangerous cycle of self-harm and damaging relationships, she found herself in the chair of a slim, balding and effortlessly optimistic psychiatrist – a man whose wisdom and humanity would wrench her from the vibrant and dangerous tide of herself, and who would help her to recover when she tried to end her life. Emma’s loving and supportive family circled around her in panic. She was on the brink of drowning. But she was also still working, still exploring, still writing, and she had also fallen deeply in love. One day, when Emma called to make an appointment with her psychiatrist, she found no one there. He had died, shockingly, at the age of fifty-three, leaving behind a young family. Processing the premature death of a man who’d become her anchor after she’d turned up on his doorstep, she was adrift. And when her significant and all-consuming relationship also fell apart, she was forced to cling to the page for survival. A modern-day fairy tale of New York, Your Voice in My Head is a dazzling and devastating memoir, clear-eyed and shot through with wit. In a voice unlike any other, Emma Forrest explores breakdown and mania, but also the beauty of love – and the heartbreak of loss. (From Goodreads, 24th November 2013)

Review:

When Emma discovers that her Psychiatrist has passed away she begins to reminisce about the man who had helped her to begin stabilizing her rather turbulent life. We learn about both Emma and her Psychiatrist through Emma’s words.

‘Your Voice in my Head’ is a novel written with a rawness that epitomizes the deep depressions Emma has encountered, along with the risky behavior of her highs.

This is a novel about grief and loss, as well as about finding strength, and using the lessons of those who are dead to help you in your future. It shows us the selflessness of some people, and the selfishness of others. This is a novel about people. The good and the bad. However, unlike many novels about mental illness, in this novel Emma manages to work, and continue with life even when this seems impossible. This was ‘nice’ because many books out there about mental health, memoirs and fiction, deal with people who do not function, cannot work and often are institutionalized. In this case it was a breath of fresh air to see someone dealing with severe mental illness but still holding life together, however precariously. Considering the majority of people with mental health problems are treated in the community and manage to work, it is a group highly under represented in the book world.

At the time of reading ‘Your Voice in my Head’ I had just suffered a bereavement and initially gave this book 3 out of 5 stars on my Goodreads account. However, I feel after writing this review that I did not appreciate this books as much as I think I would have if I were to have read it at a different time. I now believe this is a novel I will have to re-read in order to give an accurate rating, but due to the points I raised above I will give ‘Your Voice in my Head’ a 4 out of 5.

The Iron Daughter By Julie Kagawa

Title: The Iron Daughter

Author: Julie Kagawa

Publisher: Mira Ink

First Published: January 1st 2010

Blurb:

Half Summer faery princess, half human, Meghan has never fit in anywhere. Deserted by the Winter prince she thought loved her, she is prisoner to the Winter faery queen. As war looms between Summer and Winter, Meghan knows that the real danger comes from the Iron fey—ironbound faeries that only she and her absent prince have seen. But no one believes her.

Worse, Meghan’s own fey powers have been cut off. She’s stuck in Faery with only her wits for help. Trusting anyone would be foolish. Trusting a seeming traitor could be deadly. But even as she grows a backbone of iron, Meghan can’t help but hear the whispers of longing in her all-too-human heart.(From Goodreads, 14th November 2013)

Review:

It has been nearly a year since I read “The Iron King” and I have no idea why I waited so long to pick up “The Iron Daughter” but I am so glad that I finally did. I had read some negative reviews saying it was just a love story. But I found that despite the teen romance going on there was a lot of adventure keeping me interested and reading late into the night. In “The Iron King” Meghan is attempting to save her little brother from the the Iron King, and just discovering the world of Faery. In “The Iron Daughter” Meghan is implicated in a much bigger adventure that affects all those that live in the Never Never.

I will not write any more about the actual plot as I do not want to spoil either the first or second books in this series for anyone. However, this novel is great and I would highly recommend it for teenage girls. We have romance, but not too much, yes there is some bits I thought ‘can’t we just get on with the story!?!?!’ but that is me, I prefer the action. Despite this, there is plenty of action to keep you entertain, plenty of mysteries, and pangs of doubt, because we all know Faeries are mischievous!

For a young adult novel I find that both “The Iron King” and “The Iron Daughter” are well thought out and have a great deal of imagination within the pages. Julie Kagawa has created a world I love, with characters that you love, and characters you are simply terrified off. Julie Kagawa has created novels that I think many teenage girls would love and could get reluctant readers to sit down and escape into the narrative.

4 out of 5

Hold Still By Nina LaCour

Title: Hold Still

Author: Nina LaCour

First Published: 25th September 2009

Publisher: Dutton Juvenile

Blurb:

Devastating, hopeful, hopeless, playful . . . in words and illustrations, Ingrid left behind a painful farewell in her journal for Caitlin. Now Caitlin is left alone, by loss and by choice, struggling to find renewed hope in the wake of her best friend’s suicide. With the help of family and new-found friends, Caitlin will encounter first love, broaden her horizons, and start to realize that true friendship didn’t die with Ingrid. And the journal which once seemed only to chronicle Ingrid’s descent into depression, becomes the tool by which Caitlin once again reaches out to all those who loved Ingrid—and Caitlin herself. (From Goodreads, 21st November 2013)

Review:

‘Hold Still’ is a hard hitting novel dealing with the topic of suicide. Caitlin is dealing with the aftermath of her best friend, Ingrid’s, suicide. Caitlin has withdrawn from life and is dreading the return to school after the summer holidays. Her parents do not know how to help there grieving daughter and Caitlin does not know how to deal with her loss.

Upon finding Ingrid’s journal Caitlin begins to learn what went through her friends mind during those last months before she ended her life.

‘Hold Still’ was Nina LaCour’s debut novel and a brave novel at that. I was taken in by the rawness of this novel and the fact that this novel dealt with teen suicide – a topic that you do not find often. Nina captures the loneliness, the confusion, the loss and the grief Caitlin is battling whilst also expressing the depression that plagued Ingrid to eventually take her life. Understanding the differences between these two states is hard but Nina captures these different states very well.

This is a novel that although the main topic is morbid, and depressing, we have a novel of hope. Caitlin begins to deal with her loss by gaining friendship in unlikely places. By finding a task that helps remind her that there is a point, that she can keep going. That she is not the only person who has lost someone close to her.

This is a novel on a tricky subject and it is hard to know who would appreciate this subject. As a psychology student who’s main interest is in mental health, novels like this are very interesting to me. I find it enlightening that such novels are written for young adults and that it can open up the lines of communication so discussion about suicide can come about, and no longer brushed under the carpet. However, the subject matter is hard and I would advise caution to readers who are fragile, have recently had a loss, or are dealing with issues such as suicide and depression. But, on the other hand, this novel may help some gain insight and strength to help in dealing with the issues they are experiencing.

A brave novel which I highly recommend and I commend Nina LaCour in creating such a thought provoking read for young adults.

4 out of 5

There are Reasons Noah Packed No Clothes By Robert Jacoby

Title: There are Reasons Noah Packed No Clothes

Author: Robert Jacoby

First Published: 1st October 2012

Publisher: Cloud Books

Blurb:

You need your eyes, don’t you?

So does Richard Issych. Two weeks ago he overdosed. Now he’s fighting for his life, finding threatening notes like that one on his nightstand.

“There are Reasons Noah Packed No Clothes” is the story of 19-year-old Richard Issych, who wakes to a harsh new reality inside an inpatient unit. Now Richard’s journey turns into one of revelations and struggling through his own reasons for being as he discovers new meanings for redemption, sacrifice, hope, love-and the will to live.

In the end, what are the reasons Noah packed no clothes? Richard can only imagine. But it has something to do with a size 3XL bowling shirt with the name “Noah” stitched over the pocket.

There are reasons . . . everyone uses his own dictionary.

There are reasons . . . some new heavens come from some new hells.

There are Reasons Noah Packed No Clothes. (From Goodreads, 19th November 2013)

Review:

Richard Issych wakes up in a psychiatric hospital after a failed suicide attempt. He is disoriented and unable to function. But soon he begins to learn about ward life, develop ‘friendships’ with the other patients, and learn about himself and his depressive illness.

This is a novel written from Richards view in which Robert Jacoby captures through his writing style the true confusion and altered mental state Richard is experiencing. However, this writing style is confusing and can be difficult to follow at times, but it allows the reader to get a better understanding of what it can be like for some people suffering with acute mental illness.

I have read many novels about mental illness and this is one of the few that captures the mental state of the protagonist well with the structure of the prose. But, I just felt there was a lack of conclusion, a lack of real journey. Yes, we do see Richard improve and develop an understanding of mental illness. We see some reflection and development of relationships, but on the other hand I found there to be very little plot to keep me interested in the novel.

A novel to gain an insight into the mind of a psychiatric patient, with lyrical prose. However, the lack of real plot made this a rather circular novel with no real conclusion in my opinion.

3 out of 5

Gone Girl By Gillian Flynn

Title: Gone Girl

Author: Gillian Flynn

First Published: 2012

Publisher: Weidenfeld & Nicolson

Blurb:

On a warm summer morning in North Carthage, Missouri, it is Nick and Amy Dunne’s fifth wedding anniversary. Presents are being wrapped and reservations are being made when Nick’s clever and beautiful wife disappears from their rented McMansion on the Mississippi River. Husband-of-the-Year Nick isn’t doing himself any favors with cringe-worthy daydreams about the slope and shape of his wife’s head, but passages from Amy’s diary reveal the alpha-girl perfectionist could have put anyone dangerously on edge. Under mounting pressure from the police and the media–as well as Amy’s fiercely doting parents–the town golden boy parades an endless series of lies, deceits, and inappropriate behavior. Nick is oddly evasive, and he’s definitely bitter–but is he really a killer?

As the cops close in, every couple in town is soon wondering how well they know the one that they love. With his twin sister, Margo, at his side, Nick stands by his innocence. Trouble is, if Nick didn’t do it, where is that beautiful wife? And what was in that silvery gift box hidden in the back of her bedroom closet? (From Goodreads, 19th November 2013)

Review:

I was disappointed with ‘Gone Girl’ after everyone saying it was a fantastic mystery thriller, and it being voted for so many awards in 2012.

Nick’s wife has gone missing, and soon Nick becomes the main suspect. Nick initially seen as an amazing husband but soon this persona begins to unravel. But did Nick kill his wife?

The premise was one that enticed me, and from what everyone was saying I thought ‘yes, this is going to be a book that I will love’.

However, the first half of the novel bored me, but was saved with the twist in events during the second half. I am glad I kept going with ‘Gone Girl’ and would advise others who feel the same as me, just keep going! The second half is fantastic and a real page turner. There are a lot of shocks, and a lot of suspects. A psychological mind warp that makes you really wonder about the nature of people.

‘Gone Girl’ is a well planned and laid out thriller which does keep you guessing and shocking you throughout. But I cannot give ‘Gone Girl’ a high rating due to the slow first half, which nearly caused me to give up.

3 out of 5